VOLUME 7 (2019)

American and Australian Sprint Car Racing: Increasing Standardization as a Motivator for Economic Growth

McKenna Haase, Drake University, mckenna.haase@drake.edu

Thomas Mueller, Appalachian State University, muellerts@appstate.edu

ABSTRACT

This study provides an analysis of sprint car regulation in Australia and the United States, related to the economic concept of standardization. Standardization is many times associated with the value of network effect. Network theory posits social actors will be motivated to defer from immediate economic gain, instead opting for enrichment of relationships through reciprocity and trust. Using Speedway Australia as a model, we advocate for a sanctioning organization in the United States that governs standardized racing classes, particularly at the youth level. This will allow the sprint car motorsport industry to attain an increased economy of scale, decrease costs and increase the value of the sprint car motorsport brand. Recommendations to increase youth racing are provided including a proposal for STEM education opportunities in collaboration with the new standardized national sanctioning body.

Haase, M., & Mueller, T. (2019). American and Australian sprint car racing: Increasing standardization as a motivator for economic growth. International Journal of Motorsport Management, 7, Article 1.

Justice for All? The Effect of Competitive Balance in NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle Racing

Clay E. Harshaw, Winston-Salem State University
C. Clinton Harshaw, Presbyterian College
Kyu-Soo Chung, Kennesaw State University


ABSTRACT
In the United States, the National Hot Rod Association (NHRA) is the premier drag racing sanctioning body. One of its popular professional categories is Pro Stock Motorcycle. In 2012, the category was dominated by two competitors from the same team. The perceived lack of parity brought criticism from the racing media and other Pro Stock Motorcycle competitors. In an effort to bring parity to the class, the NHRA revised technical rules during the 2012 season and for the 2013 season. This study examined the effects of the rules adjustments on Pro Stock Motorcycle competitive balance for the 2012 and 2013 seasons. The adjusted churn method was utilized to compute a numeric measure of competitive balance in two different ways. First, the adjusted churn was computed using the qualified racer’s initial and final ranking in the event ladder for all national events featuring the Pro Stock Motorcycle category in each of the 2011, 2012, and 2013 seasons. The churn for a competitor’s ranking is calculated as the absolute value of the difference between a competitor’s starting and finishing positions. This value of the churn is then divided by the maximum churn possible given the number of competitors to arrive at the value known as the adjusted churn. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) using these adjusted churn values of the ladder rankings as the numeric dependent variable, and year as the factor with three levels. The results indicated a significant difference in adjusted churn for event ladder competitive balance [F(2, 45) = 4.24, p = 0.021]. Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference was used as a post-hoc multiple comparison procedure to determine the nature and direction of these differences. The adjusted churn for event ladder competitive balance was lower in 2012 (M = 0.18, SD = 0.13) than that for the 2013 season (M = 0.33, SD = 0.17). Secondly, the adjusted churn was computed for the change in each competitor’s accumulated championship points before and after each national event featuring the Pro Stock Motorcycle category in the 2011, 2012, and 2013 seasons. ANOVA was then used with the adjusted churn of the accumulated championship points as the numeric dependent variable, and year as the factor with three levels. The ANOVA test results indicated significant differences in adjusted churn for accumulated championship points [F(2, 42) = 10.45, p = 0.00]. Again, Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference was used as a post-hoc multiple comparison procedure and determined that the 2012 season (M = 0.37, SD = 0.09) was lower than the 2011 season (M = 0.29, SD = 0.09) and the 2013 season (M = 0.54, SD = 0.13). No other significant differences were detected.

 

Harshaw, C.E., Harshaw, C.C., & Chung, K.S. (2019). Justice for all? The effect on competitive balance in NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle racing. International Journal of Motorsport Management, 7, Article 2.
 

Sprint Cars

American and Australian Sprint Car Racing: Increasing Standardization as a Motivator for Economic Growth McKenna Haase & Thomas Mueller

Competitive Balance

Justice for All? The Effect of Competitive Balance in NHRA Pro Stock Motorcycle Racing Clay E. Harshaw, C. Clinton Harshaw, & Kyu-Soo Chung